Natural Time To Rethink The Banner?

In a great article in the Mediapost,  they highlight some great points around the banner.

 

1) Think beyond creative

Changing creative standards time and again is not enough, no matter how rich the media is. Einstein defined insanity as doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. Over the years, we have gone from static banners to animated GIFs, to rich media and high-quality video — and none have moved the engagement needle significantly. Creative isn’t the issue. We have to adjust other levers if we want to see any substantial change to CTRs and engagement rates. We have to start thinking differently about the importance of relevance and placement.

 

2) Relevance matters most

No matter how beautiful an ad is — how interactive and cool — if it’s not relevant to the consumer in the moment, it’s not going to engage them. Intent is everything. You could be targeting the right demographic in the right DMA at the right time of year — and the audience buy itself could be spot-on — but if the intent isn’t targeted in real-time, relevance is lost.

Targeting must go beyond audience and deeper into context in order to reach customers while they’re in a buying frame of mind. Think about search engine marketing, which captures a user’s search query and surfaces ads that are specific to that query. I saw an ad for Google recently that read: “You know who wants a haircut? People looking for a haircut.” Display advertising can learn something from this kind of intent targeting. The goal is to get so granular with our targeting that advertising becomes helpful rather than irrelevant and irritating.

 

3) Just try to look natural

Can we agree once and for all that the “golden triangle” is over? Why do we insist on putting ads along the top and down the right margin? It’s not effective. This may be one of the biggest drivers behind the native advertising movement.

Native advertising allows publishers to create advertising unique to their site or platform, so that ads fit seamlessly into the page. The ads often look like publisher content, although the best practice is to clearly identify them as ads. Examples of this include Sponsored Tweets, Sponsored Posts on Facebook and Google AdWords. Publishers like Slate, The Cheezburger Network, Funny or Die and Salon are offering native options, which tend to be unobtrusive and often helpful — or at least, entertaining or intriguing.

This is where advertiser and publisher heads should be, even if they can’t technically go native. Not everyone has resources to create their own platform, but it’s the right path — ads that don’t attempt to disrupt, but fit naturally into the flow of the user experience.

4) Cue the bugle

It may be premature to call the banner dead, but we have to stop using the same tired methods to revive it. No amount of glitter and glitz can make it work — we need to think beyond appearance at the root causes of banner blindness. If we can make display smart and relevant enough to be worth seeing, we can end the problem once and for all.

See on www.mediapost.com

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Responsive ad campaign for George by Asda…Responsive to Weather

Asda has unveiled a weather responsive ad campaign for its George brand, featuring digital advertising banners which respond immediately…

 

ResponsiveAd‘s insight:

When we think of Responsive Ads,  we do not think of them as only responsive to the device size and shape as in Responsive Web Design, but responsive to the context of places, things and times around you.  Weather just happens to be one of those things that gets very interesting when we think of how Responsive Ads go “Native”

We really believe that Responsive Advertising and Native Advertising are one  in the same thing with Responsive Advertising covering more of the scope of scalability and cross-platform strategies.

Stay tuned as ResponsiveAds brings more and more products and services to the market that leverages real-time context and native advertising formats.

See on www.thedrum.com

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MediaShift Idea Lab: Why Media Sites Should Adopt Responsive Design

We were mentioned in this article….

DOES RESPONSIVE DESIGN AFFECT ONLINE AD INVENTORY?

Yes. More screen sizes mean more ad sizes, which means you could have more ad inventory to fill. Ad Networks such as ResponsiveAds.com are taking the lead by encouraging sites to sell their ad inventory in packages that include the full spectrum of mobile and standard-display ad sizes. Many sites are tackling this issue on their own and tasking their developers to create responsive ad spaces using clever CSS configurations.

See on www.pbs.org

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Cross-Screen Advertising Offers More Value for Publishers

With the growth in tablets and smartphones, Miller says responsive-designed sites are now table stakes for publishers.

 

ResponsiveAd’s insight:

Nieman Journalism Lab recently published a Q&A with Andrew Miller, CEO of The Guardian, on a variety of subjects, including responsive design. In the piece by Justin Ellis, Miller said, “To me, HTML5 or responsive-based is just actually being in the game now. If you’re not, you’ll have real issues serving content across all the tablet formats that are coming through so quickly.” The Guardian, which launched its responsively designed site in November, was only one of several major publishers to implement responsive design in 2012 – from Time to Mashable to The BBC, and more.

Although this may not be specifically related to the examples cited above, we always ask publishers, “what strategies are you using to not only monetize your responsively designed sites, but offer more value?”

We believe that by providing readers with an optimal experience across screens by using responsive design — and advertising — publishers can build content-marketing strategies that link mobile, tablet and desktop.

Going responsive can create a synergistic bundle of a campaign that allows publishers to offer cross-screen advertising. Even though there is a value for each channel independently (mobile, tablet or desktop), the sum of the whole can be treated as a boost in publishers’ overall campaigns. In addition, how the ad content best interacts in the overall editorial content will lead to different types of ad footprints and solutions, such that “native ads” can be considered responsive ads.

Responsive design also offers publishers a better way to integrate the end-user experience around ads, and not just cookie-cutter sizes that are delivered through mediation or plugged-in networks. Publishers can create inherent experiences or conversational opportunities with their content from screen to screen, as users “screen-shift.”

Thirdly, in this era of online social conversation, inbound links from Twitter, Facebook, and even search, provide new ways of gaining users like never before. Advertisers and brands that live within the editorial of a publisher that sells advertising can be treated with further insights on the overall multi-screen experience, not only within that publication, but in a greater way with usage of advanced “data analysis” tools that are coming into the market.

See on www.niemanlab.org

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Getting Google AdSense to work in Responsive Web Designed sites

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In accordance to the holiday spirit we just made this free and open tool available to enable Google AdSense in Responsive Web Sites.

As many of our sign-ups have been asking for a way to fill their remnant inventory with Google AdSense in addition to running their own responsive ad creatives, we decided to create a simple tool to bundle your different Google AdSense codes and configure which one will run on mobile, which one on tablet and which one on desktop.

Google will most likely come up with their own solution for this sometime in the near future but in the mean time publishers can use our solution to enable AdSense to work to monetize their websites across all screens!

Our solution works nicely for publishers with their own ad sales that are using DoubleClick For Publishers (DFP) and are back-filling with AdSense and publishers that are not using an ad server and are using AdSense codes directly in their sites.

Here is a link to our free tool.

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PRESS RELEASE: ResponsiveAds™ Launches New Responsive Web Design Display Banner Advertising Service

Today we are making our STRETCH(tm) product available for private-beta!  Here is the release….. we love connected moments and we wanted to memorialize 12/12/12 @12:12!

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Now available in private beta, STRETCH™ offer enables publishers, agencies and brands to effectively run the same ad creative in different configurations across desktop, smartphones and tablets.

NEW YORK, NY, December 12, 2012 –ResponsiveAds, Inc. today announces the private beta release of the world’s first, patent-pending STRETCH™ product and a collection of responsive creative ad formats. The STRETCH™ product allows customers to easily upload a standard IAB (Interactive Advertising Bureau) ad unit-sized creative and in minutes author a single, cloud-hosted rich-media HTML5 responsive creative banner ad. Customers do not need to be web designers to create ads that work seamlessly on all digital screens while outputting a single ad tag to simplify the ad operations process, with full-compatibility to existing industry ad servers. A showcase of five unique new formats can be found at responsiveads.com/ad-formats-showcase/.  * Included is a special responsive full-takeover (Backdrop™) in-cooperation with retailer Koko & Palenki for the holiday season. This ad demonstrates the “magic” of STRETCH™ as the ad acts differently in Smartphone portrait and landscape modes.

 

The breakthrough at the core of ResponsiveAds’ STRETCH™ technology directly addresses the challenges publishers are facing to effectively monetize their rapidly increasing mobile inventory. According to analyst Mary Meeker, now an Investment Partner at venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers, eCPMs (effective cost-per-thousand impression ads) are five times lower on mobile than on the desktop. The combined mobile and interactive usage vs. spend gap leaves an estimated US $20 billion immediate upside in the US market alone.

 

While the STRETCH™ product was developed with responsive web design sites in mind; it is not limited to responsive sites.   STRETCH™ ad tags can enable the same ad to work on mobile, tablet or desktop sites and apps using the patent pending process called Flow-Lines™. This new unique concept of Flow-lines™ defines the configuration for how the ad adapts automatically to different screen sizes and responds dynamically to context and user.  It is perfectly suited for brands to efficiently deliver a cross-screen campaign via just one ad-tag.

 

ResponsiveAds, Inc. has now opened its self-service platform for STRETCH™ advertising in private beta to a select group of publishers, advertisers and brands. The company is accepting requests for participation in the next round of the beta at responsiveads.com/sign-up.  Users can upload a creative asset, which outputs as a Responsive STRETCH™ banner ad unit and ad tag.  From brand awareness to direct response campaigns, the same ad can be quickly configured run across multiple screen sizes. According to Founder and CEO of ResponsiveAds, Matthew Snyder, “We are excited to bring this disruptive product to both allow publishers the ability to improve yields and sell-through across digital properties, and to enable marketers to efficiently and effectively deliver their message across mediums through this new form of bundling.”

 

There is no cost to sign up and trial STRETCH™ product.  Once customers have reached a threshold of usage, the STRETCH™ service utilizes a pricing structure that combines CPM and cost-for-creative.  The request for invitation sign-up is available from today as well as information on plans and pricing.  Visit http://responsiveads.com/sign-up to sign up for a private beta invitation.

 

 

About ResponsiveAds, Inc.

ResponsiveAds, Inc. is the publishing and advertising industries’ first-ever responsive web advertising focused company, built from the ground up to best serve the new challenges in multi-screen design and monetization. Its innovative, patent-pending technology gives publishers the freedom to seamlessly scale existing Ad Ops organizations to the needs of the marketplace. ResponsiveAds is offering a suite of products and professional services targeting multi-screen advertising for revenue acceleration across all screens.  ResponsiveAds is working with industry groups such as the IAB (Interactive Advertising Bureau) to develop these new industry ad format standards.  The company is comprised of mobile and online advertising technology experts passionately looking to solve the problems of convergence and monetization of media.

 

For more information, please visit http:// responsiveads.com

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ResponsiveAds featured in IAB white paper

IAB just released an overview white paper into Responsive Web Design (RWD) titled “Responsive Design and Ad Creative: An IAB Perspective” as an effort to foster better understanding of this new exciting trend in web development. The big challenge for publishers embracing RWD is how to setup advertising on a web site that has dynamic layout which changes based on the screen size that it’s viewed.

The white paper is featuring a responsive ad demo page that’s using ResponsiveAds STRETCH™ and SWAP™ banners to showcase how publishers can use responsive ad units to deliver the user an optimized ad for every screen size.

IAB defines responsive ad units as Responsive Creative Design (RCD).

Responsive Creative Design refers to an automated ad server process of optimizing the look and fit of an ad creative to the ad opportunity/ screen/ inventory available.

The white paper doesn’t go very deep into defining different types of RCD, but does conclude that

Together, RCD and RWD promise to revolutionize digital advertising across PCs, tablets, smartphones, and future smart devices. With the continuing proliferation of different screen sizes and resolutions, any approach that insists on a custom piece of creative for each device is unlikely to prove scalable or cost effective in the long run.

This is definitely something we can agree on.

Oh, and if you’re interested in this topic, be sure to sign-up for our upcoming white paper on the business models of Responsive Web Design:

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Our NetMagazine Article: Responsive Web Design and Advertising


We were asked to write an article for NetMagazine about Responsive Advertising.  We ended up calling it the “State of Responsive Advertising”, but it is really an  Advertising 101 for Responsive Web Design overview.   I know it was a bit long, but we had a lot to say! We are looking forward to getting deep into the Advertiser/Agency perspective as well.

We are very interested in the community of comments.  Here is some of the first pass of comments we saw on Twitter.

Keywords we searched:  ResponsiveAds, Responsive Ad,  Responsive Advertising

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